Jaci Harmsen Fine Art

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Shutter Speed

Shutter Speed

November 18th, 2013

Shutter speed is how long your shutter is open to record the image. It is measured in seconds, and generally in fractions of a second. For example, 1/60 means that your shutter is open for 1/60 of a second. 1/1000 would be 1/1000 of a second.

The longer your shutter is open, the more light will reach the sensor, which will result in a brighter image. Conversely, the less time your shutter is open, the less light will reach your sensor and you will have a darker image. 1/1000 would be...

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Aperture

Aperture

November 18th, 2013

The aperture of the lens is the opening of the lens that lets light in to record on your sensor. This hole can be made larger or smaller to let more or less light in. Itís similar to the pupil of your eye in that a larger opening will let in more light than a smaller opening.

The different apertures you can use are called your f/stops. It seems a little backwards at first, but a larger number (such as f/16) is a smaller aperture and lets in less light than a larger aperture with a...

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Iso

Iso

November 18th, 2013

ISO is how sensitive your sensor is to light. In bright conditions, your sensor doesnít need to be very sensitive. But in low light situations, you need to make your sensor more sensitive to light.

Lower ISO numbers are less sensitive to light than higher ISO numbers. Outdoors in bright light, you may use an ISO of 100 or 200. In deep shade perhaps an ISO of 400. Indoors, youíll probably need an ISO of at least 800 to 1600 and higher would not be unusual.

The trade-off with...

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The exposure triangle

The exposure triangle

November 18th, 2013

Now that you understand shutter speed, aperture and ISO, itís time to find out how they all work together to give you a proper exposure.

When you shoot in any of the auto modes, your camera chooses average settings. It doesnít know if what youíre shooting is moving or stationary. It doesnít know if you want a large or small Depth of Field. The camera doesnít know if youíre shooting a polar bear in a snow bank or a black dog in a coal mine. So it just chooses average, middle of the...

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Why you should not chase the meter

Why you should not chase the meter

November 18th, 2013

This is a good experiment to show why, when shooting in Manual mode, the point is not to just line the meter up under the 0.

I think this can be an eye opening experiment for some. All you need is your camera, a white sheet of paper & a black sheet of paper. (or a white wall or black wall, something). If you have a gray card, use it too. If you don't have a gray card, still do this experiment. Just skip the step with the gray card. You will still see a big difference.

1st step...

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Depth of Field

Depth of Field

September 25th, 2013

Depth of Field is the area of a photograph that is in acceptable sharpness. A large DoF will have a large area of the photo that is in focus, whereas a small, or shallow, DoF will have a small area in focus.

A small DoF is used when you want to isolate your subject from the background. It can be useful for things like portraits, to really make your subject stand out, or to blur an unappealing background.

A large DoF is often used for landscapes, so that everything from the...

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Displaying: 1 - 6 of 6